Rosemary medicinal uses

December 4, 2015

Last night I had a dream about Rosemary and wanted to shine a bright light on this amazing herb.

For centuries, one of the most common medicinal uses for rosemary has involved improving memory, not just for the flavor it adds to food. This herb, especially the flower tops, contains antibacterial and antioxidant rosmarinic acid, plus several essential oils such as cineol, camphene, borneol, bornyl acetate, and α-pinene that are known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and antiseptic properties. There has also been some studies that prove it helps fight cancer.

A few Tablespoons provides 16% of the daily value of vitamin A for free radical-zapping antioxidant properties, vision protection, healthy skin and mucus membranes, and increased protection from lung and mouth cancers. Mostly renowned for fighting infection, the vitamin C content synthesizes collagen, the protein required for optimal blood vessels, organs, skin, and bones.

Manganese, another of the more prominent minerals in rosemary, plays such a critical antioxidant role in the body – specifically aided by its cofactor superoxide dismutase – that it’s associated with lowering the risk of cancer, specifically breast cancer.

Rosemary also contains iron (part of the hemoglobin inside red blood cells, determining how much oxygen the blood will carry) and potassium (a component in cell and body fluids which helps control heart rate and blood pressure). There’s also fiber, copper, calcium, and magnesium, and an abundance of B vitamins, such as pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin, folates, useful for DNA synthesis and for women just prior to conception, which helps prevent neural tube defects in newborns…. uhm Hello! Why aren’t I using Rosemary more!?

Being concentrated, the dried version of rosemary provides a bit more of everything: 93 calories, 12 grams of fiber and 45% of the daily value in iron, 35% of the calcium, 29% of the vitamin C and 18% of the vitamin A needed each day, but you can also use Rosemary Essential Oil in certain instances as well.

 

Essential oil of Rosemary 

According to Modern Essentials, a guide to the therapeutic uses of essential oils, high-quality rosemary oil has analgesic, antibacterial, anticancer, anticatarrhal, antifungal, anti-infection, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and expectorant properties.

The book’s A-Z list of rosemary oil uses covers many health concerns, including for the following:

Clarity – Add a drop to your hands, rub together, and cup over your mouth and nose for up to a minute
Cough – Massage one to two drops over your chest and throat every few hours
Headaches – Add a drop to your hands, and cup over your mouth and nose for up to a minute. You may also apply a drop topically to the aching parts of your head.
Learning and memory – Diffuse the oil throughout the room, inhale directly from the bottle, rub over your temples, or apply to your toes regularly.
Vaginal infection – Massage one to two drops in or around the vagina, making sure to test for sensitivity before attempting internal use.
Both rosemary oil and teas are added to shampoos and lotions. Regularly using the oil helps stimulate follicles, aiding in long, strong hair growth. You can also massage your scalp with the oil to nourish it and remove dandruff. Rosemary oil can also be used on your pets as a hair growth stimulant and for helping produce shiny coats.

This essential oil is a disinfectant and is often used as a mouthwash, helping remove bad breath. By removing oral bacteria, rosemary oil can prevent cavities, plaque buildup, and other dental issues. The mesmerizing aroma of rosemary is worth nothing, too, making it an excellent inhalant. Rosemary oil is used in candles, perfumes, bath oils, fresheners, and cosmetics, boosting mental energy when inhaled. You can also make a hair rinse with rosemary.

Used with 50:50 dilution, rosemary oil can be applied on ankles and wrists (two to four drops), applied to chakras or vitaflex points, directly inhaled, diffused, or as an dietary supplement.

I do not recommend Rosemary essential oil with pregnant woman or woman trying to get pregnant. If you have sensitive children I would only diffuse the essential oil rather than using it topically or internally . Adding fresh or dried Rosemary  to foods or teas is my favorite way to use Rosemary.

By admin